Kim Tsuyuki
Arts & Entertainment Editor

If you’ve ever met third-year Gia Honne, “bold” would definitely be the first word that comes to mind. Honne is double majoring in Performance Art (through the Whittier Scholars Program) and Theatre, with a minor in Gender Studies. They describe their art style as “bold, abstract, and unexpected.” For visual art, they work in assemblage sculpture and installations with found objects. She told me, “So, anything, really, if that helps.” 

“Untitled” by Gia Honne.

Honne recently learned sculpture this semester, and her favorite project she’s ever done is called “Untitled.” The sculpture used Always pads, condoms, hot glue, matte red lipstick, men’s underwear, and birth control pills. The word “always” is repeated in the background, as well as on the pads. They explain the meaning of the assemblage sculpture: “it reflects on the latent-ness of sexuality and gender.” Honne also has a soft spot for film acting. The last significant acting work they’ve done was a scene from the play Stop Kiss. This was the first East Asian queer role they’ve worked on: “it felt more natural and even gave me more confidence to make bolder decisions in class.” The scene she did was a time conflict with the character’s lover. It was an intimate relationship issue, and she believes that’s always exciting to work with, “antagonizing someone else and living in the nuances of the play’s world makes an ordinary circumstance special.”

As an artist, shame from her East Asian background has been one of the most difficult bridges for her to cross. “Identity to me is confusing. I’m neither proud nor ashamed, I am just the way I am. And whether I like it or not, I know my past will have some influence on what I make,” she said. “When this happens, I don’t judge the art, and let the thought process flow. Then, I edit from time to time to make sure I want to make those decisions.”

One way that Honne stays in tune with their identity is through music: “Music and its cultures is a clear indication of my identity. For example, if I see meme admins on Instagram who have similar music taste (and humor because I’m there), they also tend to be queer and/or trans meme admins.”

Honne believes that feeding people is an art, as well as a careful responsibility. For the past four weeks, she has been working with Feed the Streets LA. According to their website, “L.A. provides food security for the undocumented immigrants who are the backbone of the hospitality industry in the greater Los Angeles area.” She’s been making 40 – 50 homemade meals every Sunday and switches up what she makes every week. “Although it’s not necessarily relevant to my major, food is one of my love languages, and I wanted to express that with Feed the Streets.”

“As an artist, please don’t be afraid to fail,” said Honne when I asked them to give advice to other artists, “Don’t even be afraid to not be the best. There is no best or top — that concept is a construct. All in all, what helped me was developing the will to struggle for something I’m passionate about. This also made me believe in my worth.”

They have an art exhibition and installation coming up next Spring. At that same time and space, there will be their senior project and art + technology fellowship: “The senior project will explore assemblage sculpture mediums with performance inspired by Gen Z meme culture.”

Honne hopes to continue her film acting after she’s done with her undergraduate work: “ I have a soft spot for film acting, mostly due to my affinity with it and an amazing mentor.” She wants to expand into spaces such as theater performance and performance in contemporary art: “I hope to be able to show my seven-year-old self that I can live off as a performer.”

Featured Image: Courtesy of Gia Honne

Author

  • Kim Tsuyuki

    Kim Tsuyuki is a third-year English major with a minor in Film Studies. This is her first year working for the QC and is currently writing for the Arts & Entertainment section. When she isn’t working, she can be found playing video games, collecting stickers, and watching the same three movies (over and over, like chill out Kim). She’s kinda sad, but mostly hungry.

Kim Tsuyuki is a third-year English major with a minor in Film Studies. This is her first year working for the QC and is currently writing for the Arts & Entertainment section. When she isn’t working, she can be found playing video games, collecting stickers, and watching the same three movies (over and over, like chill out Kim). She’s kinda sad, but mostly hungry.

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